Tag Archive for ad analysis

Advertising & Rhetoric

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Perhaps it’s because I can’t resist a good laugh.  Perhaps it’s because of Elaine Benes and the J. Peterman catalogue.  Whatever the reason, I love SkyMall. It’s free entertainment.  Cat toilets and portable infrared sauanas—what’ s not to love?

But if I’m truthful the product descriptions are the best part.  Anybody who can write up a product description about Skel-E-Gnomes deserves respect.  Plus with the Aziz Ansari stamp of approval there isn’t a reason to debate the importance of this magazine.

As English teachers, most of us teach visual rhetoric and advertising too. SkyMall can be an excellent way to implement some of the rhetoric studied.

Have students examine the catalogue.  Then, ask that they write their own product descriptions.   This type of an exercise offers students the opportunity to practice rhetorical strategies in a small space.

Provide them a list of images from the magazine.  They will choose one and write its product description.  It’s important they don’t see the original.  This should be an exercise in advertising and rhetoric. You can set a word count and ask that they employ a certain amount of rhetorical devices too.  You might even end this exercise by having students work with the 2005 AP Language and Composition rhetorical analysis from The Onion.

 

Possible Skymall Products

 

Possible Rhetorical Devices

  • Anaphora
  • Epistrophe
  • Polysndeton
  • Asyndeton
  • Metaphor
  • Alliteration
  • Simile
  • Rhetorical Appeals
  • Testimonals

 

If you’re feeling very adventurous you might have them construct a product description and a satirical version as well.

Rhetoric: Olympic Advertisements

As promised, today we talk about Olympic advertisements.  While the 2012 games are over, it’s still a good way to engage students in the process of viewing advertisements through a critical lens.   Introduce this particular exercise by discussing the sheer size of an Olympic audience and the role that Olympic sponsor.  Some good resources for this kind of discussion include:

Begin by asking students to simply watch the commercials without pens and pencils.  They’ll think you’ve lost it.  Then, ask them to watch a second time recording responses for critical thinking questions and SOAPSTone.  You may choose to discuss as a class or have them turn in for a grade.

P&G “Proud Sponsor of Moms

As you watch the commercial construct a series of detailed notes for each category of SOAPSTone. 

Speaker Occasion Audience Purpose Subject Tone
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1.  Explain the impact of using this particular age/size of children?  Why not babies?  Why not teens?

 

  1. Describe the emotional impact of the commercial itself and explain how that effect is accomplished.

 

 

  1. Why is there no dialogue until the very end?

 

  1. Why end with the image of a diver? Why not the weightlifting or balance beam?

 

 

 

Nike’s “Find Your Greatness

As you watch the commercial construct a series of detailed notes for each category of SOAPSTone. 

Speaker Occasion Audience Purpose Subject Tone
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Why begin with only the noise of the jogger’s feet on the pavement?

 

  1.  Define greatness in modern culture.  Define greatness according to this video.  Put both in your own words.

 

Now, identify the pros and cons to the videos perspective on greatness.  Be thoughtful in your responses. 

Pros Cons
    
    

 

  1.  Why argue that “greatness” is not a rare DNA strand?  Think about audience and where/when this commercial was aired.

 

  1. What argument does the commercial convey?  What might be the purpose of such an argument in light of the audience/event in which it aired?

Super Bowl 2012: Car Commercials

I do believe that, taken all together, Chevy’s commercials in Super Bowl XLVI were hands down the best.  From indie music to humorous takes on the apocalypse they presented a good/fresh take on the tired car add.  But, it would be unfair to simply examine Chevy commercial after Chevy commercial.  Even though I was born near Detroit, it can’t just be about the Motor City.

This Super Bowl had some solid car commercials.  They might not rival Chrysler’s “Imported from Detroit” commercial, but they’ll work, offering examples of teamwork, high school “expectations,” and the animal affections discussed in yesterday’s post.  Use the ads and the accompanying questions below as starting points for implementing a smaller unit based solely on car commercials.

Hyundai “All for One

  1. Examine the limited dialogue between characters in the commercials.  Focus specifically on words like “impossible” and “try.”  What is the connotation of these phrases as they relate to the action of the ad?
  2. Why would Hyundai choose the Rocky theme song to sell their product?  Consider their origin, how their seen as a car manufacturer, even their car design/price as you respond.
  3. List as many categories of Hyundai employees as possible.  What is the argument being made by their inclusion?
  4. Humor?  Identify it.
  5. The tagline argues, “There’s always a way.  That’s just our way.”  Explain the purpose of this specific repetition (epistrophe).  What is implied?

Chevy “Happy Grad

  1. Explain how this commercial plays upon a “preconceived” notion about graduation and gifts.
  2. Identify two ways in which humor is created via the parents’ interactions with each other.
  3. Explain two ways in which this high school grad is characterized. For each explain what this characterization is supposed to imply to the audience.
  4. Many car commercials, read Lexus holiday ads here, focus on using elaborate bows on cars in an effort to suggest the “size” of the gift.  Examine the commercial again.  Look for the red bow.  Decide why its inclusion creates humor.
  5. This commercial was the winning entry in the Chevy Route 66 Super Bowl ad contest.  What significance results in having an individual create/construct this ad instead of a company?  When 2012 Super Bowl air space runs 3.5 million dollars per 30 seconds, what does Chevy have to gain from using this type of an ad?

 

Volkswagen “The Dog Strikes Back” and Making of Video

The great thing about the Volkswagen commercials is that the company also releases a “making of video.”  It’s a great way to get students to reconsider the way in which we culturally view advertising.  Have students watch the making of video after viewing the commercial as a way of deepening your discussion about the rhetoric of today’s advertising.

  1. What is the advantage of having limited narration?
  2. What role does music play in telling the story?  Explain the impact.
  3. Identify the elements of humor employed.  What impact do they have on the audience since the actor is a dog? Why build an entire narrative around a character who can’t speak?
  4. Is the Star Wars theme, a nod to last year’s “The Force” commercial necessary?  Explain whether or not this “nod” to last year’s Super Bowl commercial helps or hinders the narrative.

  1. What argument is made about Volkswagen’s ads and their impact on a global audience?
  2. Identify the elements of humor employed in the “making of” video.  Explain why they exist.  Isn’t this supposed to be just an explanation of how the commercial was shot?
  3. What does the attention to detail in the Stars Wars section convey to the audience?
  4. Consider the amount of time that went to into constructing the costumes and the set what argument is being made about consumers and Volkswagen’s relationship to them?