Tag Archive for Global Citizen

Blogs as Text: Overview

It is difficult to get 6-12th graders to read.  This isn’t even an argument about getting them to read well, closely or critically.  They just don’t read.  Sometimes they don’t even read things that they would actually enjoy like The Catcher in the Rye or The Things They Carried.  And it’s infuriating.  As teachers, we often bemoan the lack of reading our students do. But what’s to be done?  Offering student choice is important but it can be daunting even for a seasoned teacher.  Finding resources that are well written and engaging can prove exhausting.  And in light of technology’s effect on publication shouldn’t students be reading a variety of online texts?

It’s no wonder we struggle.

My argument is not that we do away with Heart of Darkness or The Scarlet Letter or even the glorious Light in August.  Students need to be challenged and held accountable.  But I do want students to read texts they find enjoyable without sacrificing journalistic and literary merit.

So many educators argue the need for students to critically analyze a variety of texts.  And so many more argue the importance of using blogs in the classroom.  But frequently those two arguments don’t overlap in a way that identifies blogs as texts to supplement student reading.  In all fairness, it can be difficult to find blogs that students can read consistently for style, argument and substance.  And yet, they do exist.  It is the goal of this week’s post to identify them and discuss how to use them in classroom.  These posts will consider a variety of student interests (i.e. science, technology, cars, pop culture) without sacrificing quality in hopes that as an educator you can have students spend a “unit” or even a quarter towards studying and reading blogs.

Week in Review: Good Magazine

           Friday Dialogue from                What does Emily say?

                                      Your Two Favorite Educators 

As Emily and Aubrey look back over the week they use their razor sharp wit to analyze the nature of what truly is good.  Angelina Jolie or Parks and Rec?  

1.  Is it difficult to teach students to be global citizens?

Emily:  I think you are correct in your post this week when you say that we expect a lot out of students.  I know I was not even remotely as globally aware What does Emily say?as the students are now.  However, I think there is also something to be said for the relatively quiet period in which I grew up.  The only major thing that happened when I was growing up was the Gulf War.  Then, a bit later, was the Bill Clinton scandal, which, let’s be honest, most adults didn’t even fully understand at the time because of the semantic firestorm.  Maybe it is also because I was raised in a Republican household (go Mitt!).  Also, technology has made knowledge so much more accessible and relevant to students.  One of my favorite things this week was having students tell me they were reading tweets while watching the State of the Union….yeah, that’s a good sign for education!

Aubrey: I think that I wasn’t aware because nobody held me accountable for that type of knowledge.  While I do think technology makes it easier for students to access information I would disagree that this makes them more knowledgeable.  They know more then I did at their age, but not by much.  Unless of course we’re talking about cable television programming.  They seem to know quite a bit about that.  

2. Do you believe it’s important  tests like the SAT and AP expect students to marshal knowledge from a variety of sources?

Emily:  Yes.  But what frustrates me is that it seems as though the evidence they are looking for now isn’t literary or historical examples.  I know that using Angelina Jolie as an example for philanthropy is great, but c’mon.  Angie?  Whatever happened to Rockefeller?
Is Aubrey right?
Aubrey:
This actually doesn’t bother me.  Don’t get me wrong I would prefer Ida B. Wells or Kate Chopin as examples.  However, I have read some very thoughtful essays that discuss reality television stars and how their behavior reflects social norms.  Okay so I made up the “social norms” bit but they did “sort of” talk about cultural significance.  

3.  In Tuesday’s post the lesson focused on having students define the idea of “good” in a variety of ways.  Identify what you consider to be “good.”  Explain whether or not you think individuals have the responsibility to do good.

Emily:  I think it is pivotal for students to understand “good” humor.  For example, I am funny.  Parks and Recreation is funny.  Wearing brightly colored shoes without tying the laces is funny. Boys wearing skinny jeans are funny, not cool.  This is an important lesson for them to learn to better the lives of those who have to look at them.

Aubrey:I like that you’ve skipped answering the heavy “does the individual need to do good” bit of the question.  If I were grading your response it would be a 4.5 out of nine for only answering half the prompt.  And now, after my rebuke, I would like to not answer the question by saying the following:  it is important for students to understand what is NOT good.  Racer back tank tops in January with no cardigan/hoodie, band-aid skirts and telling me how this “is the worst book [they’ve] ever read.”  As if.