Tag Archive for Super Bowl 2012

Super Bowl 2012: Car Commercials

I do believe that, taken all together, Chevy’s commercials in Super Bowl XLVI were hands down the best.  From indie music to humorous takes on the apocalypse they presented a good/fresh take on the tired car add.  But, it would be unfair to simply examine Chevy commercial after Chevy commercial.  Even though I was born near Detroit, it can’t just be about the Motor City.

This Super Bowl had some solid car commercials.  They might not rival Chrysler’s “Imported from Detroit” commercial, but they’ll work, offering examples of teamwork, high school “expectations,” and the animal affections discussed in yesterday’s post.  Use the ads and the accompanying questions below as starting points for implementing a smaller unit based solely on car commercials.

Hyundai “All for One

  1. Examine the limited dialogue between characters in the commercials.  Focus specifically on words like “impossible” and “try.”  What is the connotation of these phrases as they relate to the action of the ad?
  2. Why would Hyundai choose the Rocky theme song to sell their product?  Consider their origin, how their seen as a car manufacturer, even their car design/price as you respond.
  3. List as many categories of Hyundai employees as possible.  What is the argument being made by their inclusion?
  4. Humor?  Identify it.
  5. The tagline argues, “There’s always a way.  That’s just our way.”  Explain the purpose of this specific repetition (epistrophe).  What is implied?

Chevy “Happy Grad

  1. Explain how this commercial plays upon a “preconceived” notion about graduation and gifts.
  2. Identify two ways in which humor is created via the parents’ interactions with each other.
  3. Explain two ways in which this high school grad is characterized. For each explain what this characterization is supposed to imply to the audience.
  4. Many car commercials, read Lexus holiday ads here, focus on using elaborate bows on cars in an effort to suggest the “size” of the gift.  Examine the commercial again.  Look for the red bow.  Decide why its inclusion creates humor.
  5. This commercial was the winning entry in the Chevy Route 66 Super Bowl ad contest.  What significance results in having an individual create/construct this ad instead of a company?  When 2012 Super Bowl air space runs 3.5 million dollars per 30 seconds, what does Chevy have to gain from using this type of an ad?

 

Volkswagen “The Dog Strikes Back” and Making of Video

The great thing about the Volkswagen commercials is that the company also releases a “making of video.”  It’s a great way to get students to reconsider the way in which we culturally view advertising.  Have students watch the making of video after viewing the commercial as a way of deepening your discussion about the rhetoric of today’s advertising.

  1. What is the advantage of having limited narration?
  2. What role does music play in telling the story?  Explain the impact.
  3. Identify the elements of humor employed.  What impact do they have on the audience since the actor is a dog? Why build an entire narrative around a character who can’t speak?
  4. Is the Star Wars theme, a nod to last year’s “The Force” commercial necessary?  Explain whether or not this “nod” to last year’s Super Bowl commercial helps or hinders the narrative.

  1. What argument is made about Volkswagen’s ads and their impact on a global audience?
  2. Identify the elements of humor employed in the “making of” video.  Explain why they exist.  Isn’t this supposed to be just an explanation of how the commercial was shot?
  3. What does the attention to detail in the Stars Wars section convey to the audience?
  4. Consider the amount of time that went to into constructing the costumes and the set what argument is being made about consumers and Volkswagen’s relationship to them?

Super Bowl 2012: Intro Advertising

Today we begin to tackle Super Bowl commercials from 2012.   Our goal: to give you some articles and videos to begin a unit on teaching advertising. Hopefully by now your heartburn and disdain for Mr. Quiggly has worn off.

iStockphoto.com

To begin, consider having students read The New York Times article, “Before the Toss, Super Bowl Ads.” This year, most Super Bowl advertisers have released ads early or offered up 30-second teasers.  As a result, Super Bowl ads have been viewed, liked, tweeted and reblogged millions of times.  This shift in marketing should be one of the primary focuses of their annotation as they read the article.  You’ll also want them to examine the accompanying infographic.

Consider using the following questions for classroom discussion or written response:

  1. Discuss the pros and cons of releasing a full length commercial before the Super Bowl.
  2. What type of argument do companies make about their products by creating a “teaser” or “trailer?”
  3. Examine the infographic.  Consider the number of ads presented by individual companies as well as the quarters in which the commercials air.  Construct two implicit arguments based on the information.  (THINK: what impact does timing have on an advertisement and/or brand?)

NPR also has an excellent story about the “Three Hidden Themes of This Year’s Super Bowl’s Ads” that you might consider having your students examine too.  Be forewarned.  The third theme is “sex” and specific reference is made to a drinking game based on the types of commercials that appear during the game.  If you choose to give your students only a section, stick to number one and two on the list.

Consider using the following questions for student response. 

  1. Why might “nostalgia” be one of the best ways to market towards any audience?  Identify what types of objects, characters, music, etc. would trigger your own nostalgia and make you more likely to buy a product.  See if you can do the same for types of “nostalgia” might “trigger” your parents.
  2. The story argues that human attention is “arrested” when animals appear on screen.   Why do animal ads sell?  Remember not all advertising includes “cute” kittens/puppies.
  3. What is it about ads with sex appeal that sells an item?  Do commercials that appeal to sex draw audience focus away from the actual product?

Finally, consider using the video below from sharethrough.  Their tagline is “every day should be the Super Bowl.”  Have students watch the video looking specifically to identify implicit arguments.

  1. What is implied by the use of the phrase “a battle of advertisement?”
  2. Define “content” according to the video.  Explain the difference between “contents” impact on the viewer versus “ads.”
  3. What is implied about consumers’ power in regards to advertising?  What role does technology play?
  4. The video ends by saying that this type of shift will make good advertising a “lasting part of our culture.”  Explain what the cultural role of advertising should be.