Tag Archive for Time Magazine

“Best of” Lists: Photos

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It’s no secret how much we love using images to teach students about arguments.  Over the last several months we posted about image analysis, advertisements, and our favorite image resources from the National Archives and Library of Congress. While images can’t replace text, they can engage even the most reluctant students.

We would be remiss in our discussion of annual Best of 2011 lists if we didn’t show you some of the best images of the past year.   Today’s resources will give you a starting point as you look towards implementing image resources in your class

The Big Picture

As a basic classroom resource for teaching students how to annotate images, this photo blog is invaluable.  However, as 2011 comes to a close, they have assembled three different image collections all under the title The Year in Pictures.  You will have to sift through the images in each collection to find useful resources but the time you invest is well worth it.

“Best of” Lists: Toys & Buzzwords

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It seems like everywhere you turn during the month of December there is another list of superlatives.  Viral videos, political gaffes, worst tweets.  We live in a culture that sums up its annual experience in lists of fives and tens. Even AARP made its own end of year top ten lists: Albums for Grownups and Movies for Grownups.

Yesterday we tried to bait you by mentioning Time Magazine’s Top 10 Everything 2011.  If you haven’t seen it in all its glory take, a moment and peruse.  You’ll find 54 lists in total ranging from Albums to Animal Stories to Sports Moments.

It would be simply impossible to use all the lists because of content and time. The goal today is to offer up two complete lists that are appropriate for use within the English classroom. Read more

Annual “Best of” Lists: Overview

In my experience, no matter how long winter break, the month of January is difficult.  The first day back is crowd control and everything afterwards is silent teenage resignation.  And it’s not just them.  January is just a “taste” of the most difficult months that are yet to come.  It can be tough for anyone, teacher or student, to be enthused.

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In order to beat the winter blahs, January blues, and lack of snow days, the posts this week will offer quick “mini” lessons to ring in 2012.  How?  By examining the “best” of 2011. What consumed us?  Who were we nationally and internationally?  What did we say, eat, tweet, produce, read, watch, experience and foul up?

Annual best of lists teach us more than what was hip (or not).  They are cultural snapshots, time capsules.  This week we give you our picks with the hopes that some of these lists will offer good classroom discussions and student based writing about those big picture arguments.  Trust me, you won’t have to do all the talking.

Need a bit of extra enticing?  Checkout Time Magazine’s Top 10 Everything 2011 in advance of tomorrow’s post.  There are 54 lists total.  Fair word of warning: you will lose track of time.