Weekend Tech: Steve Jobs

There were three apples that changed the world: Eve's, Newton's and Steve's.

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Yesterday we talked about Steve Jobs and how to use public outpourings of grief as a way to teach everything from argument to media literacy.  Today we continue by looking at some other choices.  I know that the below link don’t do justice to what exists. They do however provide varied points of view.  Click around and let us know if you have other resources/ideas.

Mourning Steve Jobs: The Purpose of Public Grief

Leave it to The New Yorker.  While I profiled their Back Issues Blog yesterday, the quality of their articles is undeniable.  Today we look at an article from the News Desk.  It’s perfect for student use in class.  They can practice annotating for SOAPSTone and evaluating O’Rourke’s argument.  What’s useful about this article is that it also includes links to other memorials which means a “multi-layered” media literacy strand. 

New York Times: Infographic-Steve Jobs’s Patents

Okay you’ve got me.  The New York Times has multiple stories, images, remembrances, tweets, etc.  This one I like because it takes you through a series of clickable sketches showing all of Jobs’s patents.  It feels like your doing research with each click.  It’s a great resource for talking about online layout and argumentation with multiple images and layered texts.  Be prepared to read through in advance.  It’s a weighty graphic.

The White House Blog

It’s a blog.  It’s a blog by The White House.  It’s a blog that includes a personal statement from President Obama.  What else do I need to say?  It’s perfect for discussing blogger credibility or the art of political rhetorical via blog.  Discuss the implications of such a post or have students write.

Tech Crunch: Stephen Colbert’s homage to Steve Jobs 

Tech Crunch offers an interesting article about Colbert’s lighthearted and yet meaningful discussion of Jobs’s death.  Have student watch and write about point of view, humor and memorializing.  The end is particularly good for classroom discussion and writing considering the audience goes silent.

Slate: Help the Next Steve Jobs

In this piece from Slate, one of our favorite online editorial spots, Steve Jobs becomes a PSA for organ donation.  It’s such an interesting point of view in light of all the others.  Use it to talk about argument and point of view.  Perhaps it could even be a discussion about what leaders, in any field, represent publicly.

One comment

  1. [...] Steve Jobs In the Classroom | Where the Classroom Ends Four more articles/posts that are great for discussing current events, public grief, social media, and writing evaluation. (More Steve Jobs links and ideas for teaching students media literacy. Source: wheretheclassroomends.com [...]

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